Perfect Pairings: Childhood Favourites & What You Should Read Now

Hey, Savvy Readers!

We were feeling nostalgic, and sometimes it’s just wonderful to revisit those old well-loved books on your shelves that made you fall in love with reading in the first place. (We do this on a regular basis). Sometimes it’s nice to read a book with a similar story line because you know you’ll like it. So with this list, we attempted to match your favourite childhood chapter books with some adult fiction to sink your teeth into.

“And so for a time it looked as if all the adventures were coming to an end; but that was not to be.”

– The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, C.S. Lewis

Matilda by Roald Dahl Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly

We loved the bookish Matilda who grew up so smart and strong without anyone to turn to. That little girl defied all odds with her special gift, a little help from Miss Honey, and a whole lot of bravery. We couldn’t help but think of Hidden Figures, the story behind the genius women who helped put a man in space despite all the odds stacked against them. Their perseverance was a triumph.

 

Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh & Mitzi Bytes by Kerry Clare

Remember that little girl who hid around with her little notebook and spied on her neighbours and friends? Well, Mitzi Bytes is that little girl in the digital age. A friend, mother, and wife who has a secret blogger identity where she comments on friends and acquaintances alike. It’s all good until both storytellers get found out. Will Harriet the Spy and Mitzi survive?

 

Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White & The Wonder by Emma Donoghue

Though these two are vastly different, they have the same essence. A miracle draws in large crowds and everyone is trying to guess how it could possibly be. Both are the stories of two characters drawn together who will transform each other’s lives.

 

A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket & Stardust by Neil Gaimon

We love Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events for how it tells it like it is, and its adventurous story. The narration was almost the best part. That’s why we paired it with another classic like Neil Gaimon’s Stardust. Full of adventure as well, but the narration is just as darkly humorous as Snicket’s, and maybe even a little more so, which is why Stardust is definitely for adults.

 

Harry Potter by J.K Rowling & The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien

Though some would categorize Lord of the Rings as for children as well, I’m putting it as adult because that is a lot of pages for a kid to get through! And if you did read it as a kid, you deserve a medal for that attention span. If you loved Harry Potter as a child (and still do, of course) I recommend you take a stab at Tolkien’s beloved tale. A group of unlikely heroes fight the good fight against evil and prevail despite all the odds. It’s worth your time, not to mention the bragging rights that you finished all three!

 

Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery & Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

Though Little Women features four young women rather than just one, these two classics are each others counterparts. Two stories of growing up, friendship, family, and navigating the world, not to mention a little stubbornness and strong will. These coming of age stories feature strong women who must negotiate traditional gender roles and fight for opportunity. So if you loved Anne of Green Gables in your childhood, Little Women is for you now as an adult.

 

Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Patterson & The Lonely Hearts Hotel by Heather O’Neill

All about a beautiful friendship, these two novels are so achingly beautiful and well written that they just had to be paired together. Bridge to Terabithia, as you remember, is probably the first novel that made you cry. It tore your heart open and left you crushed, but by the end of the novel you felt its beauty. Heather O’Neill’s The Lonely Hearts Hotel does the same to you. I warned you. But you cannot let this star pass you by, it’s a must-read.

What are your favourite children’s books? Or your favourite pairing? Let us know in the comments below or on Twitter @SavvyReader.

As always, happy reading!

Brenann

Follow me on Bookstagram @brenann_lsf

 

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Canadian publishing professionals and bloggers. Looking for savvy readers to talk books with us!

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