Our Favourite Celebrity Memoirs

Do you ever daydream about how worry-free life must seem through the eyes of a celebrity? We do. We imagine that the world would look…shinier. More glamorous. And while that may be the case, we’ve come to learn through reading our favourite celebrity memoirs that though its rewards are seemingly endless, life in the spotlight doesn’t always exempt its chosen ones from their fair share of challenges, blunders and missteps.

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Because when you take away the glitz, the glam and the wealth (…need we go on?), the famous faces behind these memoirs are, underneath it all, people who are just trying their best to figure it all out. Celebrities: they’re—

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—kind of like us.


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Unfiltered by Lily Collins

To us, Lily Collins has always felt a little more accessible than other celebrities—her unaffected approachability gives us the impression that she’d just as soon be your friend as grace your screen. And since Unfiltered focuses on urging readers to embrace who they are—as they are—it turns out that we were onto something. The candid, honest (and truly unfiltered) way in which Lily writes has reaffirmed for us just how relatable and down-to-earth of a person she really is—both on-screen and off. ENTER TO WIN A COPY!

 

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Buffering by Hannah Hart

We can’t get enough of Hannah Hart. From her wildly popular YouTube vlog to her hilarious (but surprisingly helpful!) My Drunk Kitchen, Hannah’s got unparalleled, unlimited charisma both onscreen and on paper. So, it’s an understatement to say that we couldn’t wait to hear what she had to say next in her new memoir, Buffering, which is an invitation into Hannah’s experiences with family, faith, love, sexuality, self-worth, friendship and fame. Prefaced with a note from the sage herself: “when you read this book, please remember: buffering is just the time it takes to process”.

 

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The Rainbow Comes and Goes by Anderson Cooper and Gloria Vanderbilt

 The perspectives of Anderson and his mother, Gloria Vanderbilt, come together beautifully and insightfully in this shared memoir. Both a son’s love letter to his mother and an unconventional mom’s life lessons for her son, The Rainbow Comes and Goes offers a rare window into their close relationship and fascinating life stories.

 

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Yes Please by Amy Poehler

Out of the sharknado that is the landscape of current events, something special has emerged: women helping women. Because while it’s true that we’re comforted by times of ease, we’re bonded by times of opposition—and no one encourages women to lift one another up in strength and solidarity during these times as charmingly as Amy Poehler. Do we want the chance to read, all in one place, the words of wisdom she’s whipped up just for us readers? Yes, please.

 

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I’ll Be Damned by Eric Braeden

From the peeks we snuck at our mothers’ and grandmothers’ TV sets growing up, Eric Braden (aka Victor from The Young and the Restless) was a familiar face ever-present in the background of our childhoods. Now that we’ve followed his life story from his birth in World War II Germany to his rise to humanitarian and daytime superstar, we get the fuss: Eric Braeden is downright intriguing.

 

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Settle for More by Megyn Kelly

Though it may not always occur to us, the influential reach of ethical role models doesn’t have to be reserved for children. If yours is a path of self-discovery, re-invention or simply figuring it out as you go (we hear you on that one), Megyn Kelly will show you what it means (and how it helps!) to “settle for more”—a motto she credits as having dramatically transformed her life at home and at work.

 

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Moranifesto by Caitlin Moran

After Caitlin Moran wrote brilliantly and refreshingly on feminism in How to be a Woman, she knew that she wasn’t done with all that she had to say—but how would she express it next? There won’t be a dull moment in sight as you read about what helped shape Caitlin into the wise-cracking, on-the-ball writer that she is. After reading Moranifesto, you’ll find yourself going about life wanting to hear Caitlin’s take. On everything.

 

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Based on a True Story by Norm MacDonald

This isn’t your run-of-the-mill comedian’s memoir. For one, it’s narrated during a road trip to Las Vegas. We were instantly a fan of the format of this memoir because though Norm’s stories are interesting enough to support the book on their own, the added element of a plot woven throughout makes it an especially well-rounded read. Since when do memoirs elicit adrenaline?!

 

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Tippi by Tippi Hedren

Classy, mysterious and the muse of some of Alfred Hitchcock’s most notable films—if there’s a woman who we want a behind-the-scenes glimpse of, it’s Tippi Hedren. Not only are we intrigued by Tippi’s dark take on her Hitchcockian experiences, but since she’s the mother of Melanie Griffith and the grandmother of Dakota Johnson, our curiosity about the origin of such a powerful matriarchal dynasty was sufficiently piqued.

 

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Common Ground by Justin Trudeau

Though a political figure first and a public object of enamor second, Justin Trudeau has surfaced as the face (okay, and hair) of the next generation’s leadership ideals. Common Ground changed the way that we look at the reach and power of today’s young (but resonant!) voices.

What memoir changed the way you thought about someone in the spotlight, Savvy Readers? And was it for better, or for worse? Let us know in the comments or on Twitter @SavvyReader!

Kelly

Follow me on Twitter @OnceUponASonnet

 

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